In His own image

If you describe reality in mathematical or logical terms, as for instance in the Cognitive-Theoretic Model of the Universe, it’s natural to think of the cosmos as the output of a function in some extended metaphysical sense, which brings a whole new meaning to Genesis 1:27: “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.”

Mind you, I don’t attribute any particular theological or philological significance to this textual association. It’s a striking coincidence which may incite further thought, nothing more.

5 thoughts on “In His own image

  1. Teffec P. says:

    The Dr. Seuss was intended as a response to your poem btw. I don’t think the implications of that Langan point are axiomatic. Even Richard Dawkins doesn’t grasp why there is no “before” the big bang. This is pretty esoteric shit, but I think the belief of free will being an illusion is becoming increasingly appreciated by laypeople.

    I’m not saying consciousness is perfectly testable. The real but unmeasurable and unpredictable may forever be irretrievable or supernatural to this plane. I agree though that it has to be reducible to some level of existence.

    Look forward to reading about your conception.

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  2. Teffec P. says:

    “Today you are YOU. That is truer than true. There is no one alive who is YOU-ER than YOU.”
    – Dr. Seuss

    Everyone has something uniquely positive to offer IMO. It is hard not to be fatalistic about life outcomes, though. The two factors in classical psychology and biology thought to affect behavior and success are nature and nurture – both of which an individual has no control over. I like to think that we were bestowed with the ability to draw upon a metaphysical realm that allows us to incept acts of good will, muster ambition, and shape our own destinies, but there is that reactive “domino effect” that suggests any volition is illusory and that praise and punishment are misplaced.

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    1. Ganzir says:

      Dr. Seuss

      Cancelled

      The two factors in classical psychology and biology thought to affect behavior and success are nature and nurture – both of which an individual has no control over.

      Nobody has any control over anything. If you believe in a purely deterministic universe, then everything is preordained, and if you believe in a fundamentally stochastic universe like that of quantum mechanics, then everything is determined at least in part by events beyond our control.

      “Free will” is a meaningless assertion. At least insofar as our temporal existences are concerned, there is a cause and there is an effect.

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      1. Teffec P. says:

        Langan explains that anything that could have begotten reality is entailed in reality. Therefore reality is free of external influence and is self-determined. Determinism is bunk. The coherence and consistency of reality suggest that it’s not fully stochastic either. It remains a question if “conscious” beings also possess the ability to willfully self-configure. Consciousness I see as the ability to mentally project oneself spatially, as measured by the mirror test, and temporally, and I believe to some extent we are able to independently gauge the cost-benefit of potential courses of action. There may come a time when we can fully deconstruct and operationalize deliberation and decision making (what a dehumanizing zeitgeist that will create), but until that happens, I think it’s healthy for society to give the concept of free will some weight. I forget who the thinker was, but he said essentially that free will feeling real is good enough for him. Believing otherwise totally undermines any ascription of virtue or guilt. The uncertainty of it all has made me less vindictive, though.

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      2. Ganzir says:

        Langan explains that anything that could have begotten reality is entailed in reality. Therefore reality is free of external influence and is self-determined. Determinism is bunk.

        Yes. You don’t even need Langan to explain something when it’s as obviously tautological as this.

        The coherence and consistency of reality suggest that it’s not fully stochastic either.

        At the level of observable physics, a question like this is only answerable in terms of observable laws. In my conception of metaphysics though, it’s impossible for any event to fundamentally stochastic because everything that occurs corresponds to a static truth in information-space. I plan to write a longer explanation of my comprehensive metaphysics in the medium future.

        Consciousness I see as the ability to mentally project oneself spatially, as measured by the mirror test, and temporally, and I believe to some extent we are able to independently gauge the cost-benefit of potential courses of action.

        True. But remember that consciousness is an internal, subjective experience, independent of measurement. An entity that passes the mirror test might just be a perfectly convincing philosophical zombie, whereas even an apparently lifeless object like a rock or tree could be conscious. Apparently the animists had a point.

        There may come a time when we can fully deconstruct and operationalize deliberation and decision making (what a dehumanizing zeitgeist that will create), but until that happens, I think it’s healthy for society to give the concept of free will some weight. I forget who the thinker was, but he said essentially that free will feeling real is good enough for him. Believing otherwise totally undermines any ascription of virtue or guilt. The uncertainty of it all has made me less vindictive, though.

        Almost everyone already gives the concept of free will absolute weight. Only a tiny minority of philosophically inclined deviants wouldn’t.

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